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Freight
5 families in 6 weights
Freight
set in Display, Text, Sans, and Micro
Proxima Nova
10 families in up to 7 weights
Proxima Nova
set in Proxima Nova and Proxima Nova Alt Extra Condensed
Museo
3 families in up to 6 weights
Museo
set in Museo and Museo Sans
PT Sans/Serif
5 families in up to 2 weights
PT Sans/Serif
set in PT Serif, Sans, and Sans Caption
Abril
3 families in up to 5 weights
Abril
set in Abril Display, Text, and Fatface
Calluna
2 families iin 5 weights
Calluna
set in Calluna and Calluna Sans

Superhero Superfamilies

19th September 2013

Let’s imagine for a second that this example blog post contained information of actual worth. Some wise words of wisdom and dramatic stories.

See, that would be perfect. Not only could you absorb the information contained within the post itself, but you could appreciate the typesetting used as well. You could decide the suitability of the fonts chosen for your own projects and posts. So why stop here? Let’s keep imagining.

“Imagine that this part of the post breaks into a pull quote. Think about how that might look with the rest of the content.”

So who’s to say what type choices will resonate with the content? Well, that’s up to you; the designer. This filler text is just here to demonstrate a fairly diverse attitude. It’s formal without being uptight; entertaining, serious, and silly, all at the same time. But really, type choices are very subjective. Take it easy. Trust your eyes and your instinct.

Now that we’ve got a fair amount of body text, how about we throw some extra elements into the mix? How about, for instance, an image and a supporting caption? That should demonstrate the performance of the font at small sizes.

This is an image caption, to help demonstrate small text performance.

After that break, we can get back to the content in all its glory. Most posts end with some awe-inspiring advice or a highly quotable sentence. Not this one. This one will finish at the end of this sentence, whether you like it or not.